Course Options: 4 Days

Recommended Max People:
25

Full day from:
£855 per day + VAT to £1600 per day + VAT

Half day from:
£680 per day + VAT to £1180 per day + VAT

Add additional participant for as little as £33.00 + VAT per person per day

Please Note:
Course costs are based on 15 participants

This course can be tailored to your individual requirements

Primary mathematics: Building teachers maths subject knowledge for the new curriculum: 4 day course

Topic: Developing teachers mathematical skills and knowledge, with pedagogy

Course details

The New Maths Curriculum places greater demand upon Primary teachers own skills, knowledge and understanding of pedagogy. This course aims to develop the teacher’s own knowledge, skill, confidence and ability in order that they might develop their students’ understanding of mathematics.
We will focus on aspects of teaching primary mathematics that research suggests are effective and that often need extra attention together with looking at some of the harder to teach areas. On completion of this course, teachers will have developed their own subject knowledge and understanding. They will understand how to promote positive attitudes to mathematics.

The course will cover the following areas:

Number and calculation

  • Concrete representations leading to formal written methods of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division
  • How do mental calculations differ from written methods?
  • The simple algebra behind calculations.
  • Looking for links

Fractions and decimals

  • Addition and subtraction of fractions from concrete beginnings.
  • Multiplication and division of fractions. Why does the procedure work?
  • Making links.
  • Ordering fractions from a pictorial perspective.
  • Fractions, decimals, and percentages. Which one should we choose?

Geometry

  • What do we need to know about area and perimeter?
  • Why are the areas of all triangles calculated using the same formula? Mastery in action.
  • How many degrees in a triangle? Can you prove it?
  • Linking area of shapes to fractions
  • Pin boards; tools for proofs.

Algebra and Statistics

  • Graphs and why they are used
  • Discrete and continuous data.
  • Concrete to abstract ways to reason through probability.
  • Pattern spotting.

Aimed at

The course is aimed at mathematics coordinators and teachers

Course Objectives

  • Improved subject knowledge and skills
  • Improved pedagogical knowledge
  • Understanding of the aims of the new curriculum
  • Increased ability to take a questioning and investigative approach to how maths works

Detailed course outline and session time table

Session 1: 9:30-10:45

  • Taking concrete understanding of calculation through to abstract written methods and fluency.
  • The language of calculation
  • visualising the methods that lead to formal column applications with understanding.

Session 2: 11:00-12:15

  • How do mental calculations differ from written methods.
  • When mental methods are more appropriate than written versions,
  • Mental calculations that can be utilised within the written format.

Session 3: 1:00-2:15

  • The simple algebra behind calculations.
  • What we term as ‘number’ is usually algebra in disguise.
  • Commutativity elements of addition and multiplication

Session 4: 2:30-3:45

  • Looking for links
  • Fractions and division; inseparable.
  • Geometry and the power of simple algebraic operations.

Session 5: 9:30-10:45

  • Addition and subtraction of fractions from concrete beginnings
  • Are we always taking account of the ‘whole’ in fraction problems.
  • Imaging ‘the whole’.
  • What do we understand by the terms numerators and denominators?

Session 6: 11:00-12:15

  • Multiplication and division of fractions. Why does the procedure work?
  • Making links with multiplication and division.
  • The language and meaning of fractional division and multiplication
  • Moving towards understand the written procedures and why they work.

Session 7: 1:00-2:15

  • Ordering fractions from a pictorial perspective.
  • There are more ways to order fractions than simply finding common denominators.
  • Why do we never use common numerators?

Session 8: 2:30-3:45

  • Fractions, decimals, and percentages. Which one should we choose?
  • Mathematical reasoning and problem solving
  • When is a fraction a better route to take than a decimal or a percentage?
  • Can a footballer give 110% in a game?

Session 9: 9:30-10:45

  • What do we need to know about area and perimeter?
  • Perimeters and accuracy of measurement
  • Area: What defines it?
  • Are all areas and perimeters measurable?

Session 10: 11:00-12:15

  • Why are the areas of all triangles calculated using the same formula?
  • Mastery in action.
  • How many degrees in a triangle?
  • Can you prove it?

Session 11: 1:00-2:15

  • Linking area of shapes to fractions
  • Problem solving through mathematical reasoning.

Session 12: 2:30-3:45

  • Pin boards; tools for proofs
  • Why is the formula for the area of any triangle its base multiplied by its vertical height all divided by two?

Session 13: 9:30-10:45

  • Graphs and why they are used
  • Why show the graph of a set of data?
  • One graph fits all? Bar graphs and pie charts.

Session 14: 11:00-12:15

  • Discrete and continuous data
  • What is the difference?
  • When does a graph show discrete data?
  • When does a graph show continuous data?
  • Line graphs; what can be deduced from them?

Session 15: 1:00-2:15

  • Concrete to abstract ways to reason through probability
  • Sample spaces
  • Tree diagrams

Session 16: 2:30-3:45

  • Making predictions
  • Probability and decision making
  • Counter-intuitivity and its regular occurrence in probability

First Name

Surname

Your e-mail address

School / Establishment Name

School / Establishment Post Code

Contact Telephone Number

Predicted number of participants (if known)

Vanue you would like the course to take place

Post code

Are you already a member?

 Please create membership for me

 I'm not ready to become a member yet

captcha